Haven’t I been here before? The Anlan Suspension Bridge

As the story goes, the Anlan suspension bridge was also named the “couple’s bridge” in the honour of a man, He Xiande and his wife, who proposed its rebuilding after it was burnt down during the war that marked the end of Ming Dynasty.

We got on the suspension or the shaking bridge when we were heading towards the fascinating irrigation system at Dujiangyan. The bridge was built with strong wood and steel rope and decorated with a red cloth, the kind of bright red particular to the Chinese. The towers on which the bridge was hinged were made of good materials like the steel and strong concrete. It was a foot bridge and in its unique way added some fun to our journey.

The bridge shook as we walked on it, at first, it was scary but seeing people walk and cross over to the other side, I just braved up and did same. I had feared my belonging or someone else’s might fall off into the surrounding water body so with that thought on my mind, I clasped on my phone with all the firmness my little fingers can afford. This activity didn’t seem new to me but while on the bridge, I couldn’t place a finger on where it was that I partook in it. There were a couple of milliseconds flash backs but while I couldn’t get the pictures clearly, I was quite sure I have been here before.

During our walk, the bridge would sway or swing a bit, and people will hold onto the thick upper ropes tightly or anyone closest to them. The bridge was filled with many giggles and screams as we toddled awkwardly across it. Despite the shakings, I did take a few videos and pictures.

It was a nice and simple scenery from the bridge – sights of water, mountains, and the surrounding green vegetation, sights of people on the other side of the bridge waiting for their friends, tour companions and/or partners to cross over.

The shaking bridge which we enjoyed on the technical walk and ride to the irrigation site lasted for just few minutes. If you enjoy swinging ropes and bridges, try getting on the Anlan suspension bridge.While I typed these on my pc, again, I tried reflecting to recall why the shaking bridge experience was familiar and there it was … it was in Nigeria, during the three weeks of National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) camping, we were required to partake in some military parades and man o’ war drills which included jumping fences, rope climbing, crawling under barb wires, etc.

“No wonder!” I exclaimed to myself. “I knew I’ve been here before”

If you were part of these activities, what were they like for you?

It was quite emotional for me that a trip to Chengdu in 2019 would dig up memories of 2015 events in Nigeria for me. It made me grateful for a lot of things. I was glad I was part of the tour, I am grateful to Facebook for saving my pictures and I am grateful for the opportunity to write on this blog and be read.

You may check out for more on #wetourchina on my Youtube Channel: Oge Patrick, lots of pleasant sights for YOU.

Dujiangyan city is crowned China’s Most Charming Chinese City, China’s Excellent Tourism City, the Natural Historical and Natural City, Chinese City with the Strongest Sense of Happiness and China Longevity Village. Tourists can take bus No.1 and 4 or a taxi to the Dujiangyan Irrigation System Scenic Spot. 2. There are buses from Chengdu Chaidianzi to Dujiangyan city Passenger Transportation Center, started at 6:30 a.m. end at 7 p.m.

6 thoughts on “Haven’t I been here before? The Anlan Suspension Bridge

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  1. Huuuummmmmm! nostalgic feelings about NYSC. On a lighter note the simulated suspension bridge during your 3 weeks NYSC orientation program is not high enough. At least from the picture I dont think its more than 15 feet high. I want to believe the Anlan suspension bridge is much higher than that.

    Liked by 1 person

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